OK Go don’t let me down with ‘I Won’t Let You Down’.

I know I’m always in for a good time and thoughts of ‘Why aren’t more bands doing stuff like this!?’ when OK Go releases a new video. The video for the second single off their Hungry Ghosts album, ‘I Won’t Let You Down’ is a spectacle of high technology and creative choreography.

Filmed using a UAV copter thingy (I can’t find any behind the scenes stuff besides an occasional blurb!) with the band on Honda’s UNI-CUB performing a rolling dance routine with hundreds (thousands?) of Japanese schoolgirls/dancers armed with umbrellas and a whole lot of space.

Working with Morihiro Harano (You may remember him from this commercial for a cellphone.) and choreography by Furitsukekagyou air:man (someone I really wish had a website in english so I can learn more about whoever he/they are) the video moves indoors and outdoors in one continuous take (but there may have been multiple aerial takes stitched together in post) directed by Kabuki Seki.

Super inspiring stuff! I’ve been googling names and following links all afternoon. And of course, artists need to make a living, so if you dig their sound, buy the album!

 

Don’t tell me, show me: The Q Camera

I can’t remember when it hit my radar, but I quickly became enamoured with the idea behind this fun and stylish little camera. The Q Camera is the labour of love that started with three guys who were unhappy with their own cameras, so they set out to build one that fit their needs

The resulting shooter is not full of megapixels, nor is overloaded with features. In fact it’s purposely designed the opposite. It’s like a modern version of an old Kodak Brownie. A new retro camera with a sweet sense of style.

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It’s refreshing, really. I miss the days of the Polaroids or my old Pentax K-1000. Minimal features  that let you focus on the moment and the shot. It’s a five megapixel sensor behind a wide angle lense (24mm wide lens / F2.4 aperture)  in a small but well designed case with a manual focus ring (!!!). I love the addition of the LED ring flash that doubles as a battery meter and timer counter.

It has no removable memory, it’s touted as a social camera, connected via 3G (data plan required) to the Q Lab servers where photos are automatically uploaded. The camera has an array of old timey analog filters that can be applied to the photos and you can send them directly to your favourite social websites. (but no Instagram – yet) If you’re out of range, there’s two gigabytes of memory built in until you’re in range again.

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It’s all contained in a rugged, water proof (up to one metre) enclosure that comes in nine colours.  The view finder/hole through the top corner of the body doubles as a clip loop or, if I can get a finger into it, the axis for some dangerous and absent minded spinning.

This camera isn’t meant to replace a DSLR for pro shooting, it’s a perfect camera for those awesome days and nights out with friends. Throw it in a bag, around the neck, or into the fountain, it’ll still be snapping at the end. Easy to grab, fun to shoot, and if the promotional materials have any truth to it, will survive a dunk in cup of soda.

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I was thinking of buying one (not bad at $200), but with a little creativity I ended up winning one instead. (score!) There was a contest where people were asked to be inspired by a Q Camera colour per week. So instead of watching reruns of Friends, I created a little last minute entry for the last week of the contest responding to the Coffee Black colour:

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A day later there’s a new Q Camera on it’s way to my door! I’m looking forward to taking it out and about. It’s got a good look that I’m sure will have people asking about it. I’ll post some photos and review the Q camera and Q Lab once I get it.

What do you think?  Is it a fun and creative camera perfect for an adventure or a niche product with no niche to fill?